Department of Physics (Fredericton)

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Development of a photodiode array based astronomical imaging system
Development of a photodiode array based astronomical imaging system
by Daniel Joseph Colman Hurley, A low cost astronomical imaging system, based on a linear photodiode array is described. The system was tested for resolution, sensitivity, and dynamic range. Images, both astronomical and terrestrial were obtained. The results suggest that effective low intensity imaging, previously very expensive, can be obtained a relatively low cost., 45 unnumbered pages after last numbered page
Development of an astronomical imaging system using a charge-coupled device
Development of an astronomical imaging system using a charge-coupled device
by Todd David Kelly, Astronomy understandably began as an observational science. Conveniently man has been equipped with two detectors, his eyes, however limited they are. As in most sciences, researcher's are forever searching for new techniques and improving present equipment. In 1969 a new device was developed at the Bell Laboratories called the Charge-Coupled Device, or CCD. This device would later prove to bring never seen before pictures of the cosmos to astronomers, as well as allow the operation of Facsimile machines. It is the purpose of this project to develop a CCD Image System, for a relatively low cost, with a high spectral response, from a NEC μPD791 4096 - bit CCD Image Sensor, Appendix has irregular pagination.
Direct quantal fitting of the molecular potential energy function from experimental data
Direct quantal fitting of the molecular potential energy function from experimental data
by Tara Small, The vibration and rotation of the nuclei of diatomic molecules can be determined using a fully quantum treatment. In the past, approximate semi-classical techniques have often been used, in part due to the difficulty in modeling diatomic potential energy functions and in part due to the effort required for non-linear least-squares fitting. This thesis outlines the process that obtains a potential energy curve from experimental data using a fully quantum technique. The design and implementation of the potential energy curves incorporates physical constraints such as the long range asymptotic behaviour as well as specification and optimization of the minimum point. A concept from quantum defect theory is also used to aid in the modeling of the potential. This uses a smooth, easily-fitted curve, a quantum defect, that inherently includes the dramatic features of the potential energy at very short bond lengths. An analytic form for the wavefunction for long bond lengths is also developed. This analytic form allows for direct calculation of observables at long range that involve little numerical error and provides boundary conditions which are used to find values of the wavefunction more accurately at shorter
Estimation of acoustical properties of oceanic bottom sediments
Estimation of acoustical properties of oceanic bottom sediments
by Bryan Marks, The estimation of seafloor sediment properties is necessary for the formation of realistic geoacoustic models of the ocean floor. These models are useful in determining the effects of the ocean bottom on sound propagation. In this study, acoustical data previously taken by Defense Research Establishment Pacific (DREP) personnel was analyzed and interpreted in order to estimate some of the acoustical properties of seafloor sediments., 3 unnumbered pages before first numbered page, 2 unnumbered pages after last numbered page
FTIR spectroscopy of deuterated methanol (CD30H)
FTIR spectroscopy of deuterated methanol (CD30H)
by Katherine Joan King, 46 unnumbered pages after last numbered page.
Gas amplification in single-wire cylindrical proportional counters
Gas amplification in single-wire cylindrical proportional counters
by Robert Bierman, Gas amplification in a cylindrical proportional counter has been measured for several argon-based gas mixtures. The gain was measured as a function of anode voltage and the gas composition and pressure. To this end, the necessary apparatus was designed and assembled. This included acquiring a proportional counter and radiation source, assembling a gas plumbing system, having a gas chamber and a mount for the counter constructed, and assembling an electronics system capable of analyzing the signals from the proportional counter. The apparatus proved capable of measuring gas amplification and some preliminary data was taken.
Geodesics and cosmic expansion
Geodesics and cosmic expansion
by Michael Shannon, In this paper it is my goal to show how the solutions for the geodesics in some model of spacetime can be used to provide a locally testable result, which could be used experimentally to verify or to deny some cosmological model. Thus by studying planetary orbits we obtain certain bounds on parameters in the equations pertaining to cosmological expansion. We also examine the geodesic equations for brane world cosmological models order to judge the suitability of these models in describing our universe. Brane worlds are those models of a universe with extra dimensions, where all matter is embedded in a brane, or a hypersurface, corresponding to the observed properties of our universe. These models are akin to the higher dimensional models generated by string theory, except that the "rolled up" dimensions are replaced by extended dimensions, under the constraint that matter lie in the brane., 3 unnumbered pages before the first numbered page.
Gravitational collapse of viscous spherically symmetric stars
Gravitational collapse of viscous spherically symmetric stars
by Christian Friesen, 1 unnumbered page before first numbered page, irregular pagination after last numbered page: A1-A10, B1-B5 and C1-C3, C5-C6. C4 is missing
High precision calculation of helium fine structure and determination of the fine structure constant
High precision calculation of helium fine structure and determination of the fine structure constant
by Travis Stewart, The Few-body atomic or molecular systems are structurally simple to understand, but the physics behind such systems are extremely difficult. In these systems it is not possible to find an exact solution to the Schodinger equation, even for the nonrelativistic problem. Using new variational methods it is possible to find very precise solutions in the nonrelativistic case, and include the relativistic and quantum electrodynamic (QED) corrections perturbatively. This work is to show the corrections needed in order to make a precise theoretical assessment of the ls2p3 PJ states of helium and compare the energy splittings with experiment. Also, comparison of values of the fine structure constant with the values determined through these methods is made.
Interfacing apparatus used in optical spectroscopy to a microcomputer
Interfacing apparatus used in optical spectroscopy to a microcomputer
by Terrance Ernest Wilber Sturtevant, The use of computers in scientific research is becoming increasingly widespread. This is due to a number of factors, such as reproducibility of experimental conditions, ease of information storage using punched cards, magnetic disks and tapes, and advantages due to central control of apparatus. This report will detail the attempt to interface a Jobin-Yvon model THR spectrometer and a Photochemical Research Associates model 1770 photon counter to a Commodore PET ™ microcomputer. This system is to be used in optical spectroscopy. It is intended that the system, 2 unnumbered pages after the last numbered page
Investigation of in-air vocal communication between harbour seals (phoca vitulina)
Investigation of in-air vocal communication between harbour seals (phoca vitulina)
by Tony Reiman, Female harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) keep track of their pups by following the vocalizations the pups make. The maximum communication distance possible between the seals when communicating in the air over the sea surface was investigated and found to be about 320 metres. This value was found through the use of experimental data collected, which included sound speed profiles over the sea surface, and transmission losses of pure tones over the sea surface. The solll1d speed profiles were used in a computer model of sound transmission. The predictions of the model did not accurately reproduce the observed transmission losses, at least partly because the sound speed data were not accurate. However, physical information was obtained through the use of the computer model., 3 unnumbered pages before first numbered page. 8 unnumbered pages after last numbered page.
Laser spectroscopy of dysprosium chloride
Laser spectroscopy of dysprosium chloride
by Rajat K. Ghosh, Laser spectroscopy is an invaluable tool when investigating the quantum structure of atoms and molecules. In particular the technique of laser induced fluorescence is of great aid when creating a map of the electronic, and the vibrational states of molecules. This technique along with selective detection is useful in studying complex spectra such as those of DyCl. Dysprosium has seven naturally occurring isotopes (of which four are nearly equally abundant) and chlorine has two. The isotope spacing is such that in certain bands it is greater than the rotational spacing; thus complicating the spectra. The 0-0 bands of both the 8.5 →7 7.5, and 8.5→ 7 8.5 transitions are analyzed. Furthermore the 0-1 bands of the 8.5 →7 7 .5 and 8.5 →7 8.5 electronic transitions are investigated. Ultimately a linear regression analysis is utilized to create a global fit and find the relevant molecular constants of DyCl., 7 unnumbered pages before the first numbered page; 1 unnumbered page after the last numbered page.

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