Muriel McQueen Fergusson Centre for Family Violence Research

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A coordinated community response to domestic and intimate partner violence experienced by immigrant and newcomer women in new Brunswick - needs assessment report
A coordinated community response to domestic and intimate partner violence experienced by immigrant and newcomer women in new Brunswick - needs assessment report
This 36 month project aims to improve service responses for immigrant and newcomer women who are victims of domestic and intimate partner violence (D/IPV) in New Brunswick. Through partnerships, a coordinated community response will be developed between provincial government departments, domestic violence support-service providers, immigrant serving organizations and community partners, incorporating the lens of immigrant and newcomer women’s experiences throughout the project. The learnings from this project will be integrated into future provincial strategies to address D/IPV experienced by immigrant and newcomer women.
Achieving our potential: a workshop for survivors of intimate partner violence - facilitator guide
Achieving our potential: a workshop for survivors of intimate partner violence - facilitator guide
This workshop is designed to help women victims of intimate partner violence to build healthier and safer lives for themselves and their children. In order to achieve this goal we have the following three objectives: 1) Empower women by enabling them to lead healthier and safer lives, 2) Encourage women to participate in the elimination of intimate partner violence, and 3) Increase women’s sense of security. This manual contains information and questions that can be useful to you in various ways, such as: 1) to deliver a workshop to survivors of IPV in your community, and 2) to inform you and/or your colleagues on IPV situations.
Achieving our potential: a workshop for survivors of intimate partner violence - participant workbook
Achieving our potential: a workshop for survivors of intimate partner violence - participant workbook
Even though this Participant Workbook has been developed for women victims of IPV, the information contained in the guide is also valuable for male victims of IPV.
Action for change: empowering women victims of intimate partner violence to build healthier and safer lives
Action for change: empowering women victims of intimate partner violence to build healthier and safer lives
Intervening in situations of intimate partner violence (IPV) is one of the most difficult aspects of social work practice and social workers often encounter victims/survivors during their years of practice. Recognizing this, the New Brunswick Association of Social Workers (NBASW) in partnership with the Muriel McQueen Fergusson Centre on Family Violence Research (MMFC) at the University of New Brunswick; the Government of New Brunswick’s Department of Social Development; and the Government of New Brunswick’s Women’s Issues Branch of the Executive Council Office developed “Understanding the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence – Helping Social Workers to Better Intervene”, a train-the-trainer program for social workers in New Brunswick. This program was designed to "assist those who are in a position to deliver training to social workers about the impact of and effective responses to intimate partner violence; in other words, to build the capacity of social workers to effectively intervene in situations of intimate partner violence" (Understanding the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence - Helping Social Workers to Better Intervene: A Train-the-Trainer Manual for Delivering Training on Intimate Partner Violence to Social Workers, p.3). An Advisory Committee comprised of social workers from diverse workplaces was created to guide the overall development of the content and to ensure that generally, the information contained in the manual would be useful to social workers in all fields of practice. A Working Committee comprised of social workers from different fields of practice was formed to provide specific input on the content of “Understanding the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence – Helping Social Workers to Better Intervene”. MMFC initially delivered the train-the-trainer workshop to four social workers. These four individuals subsequently piloted the educational program with a cohort of 18 social workers practicing in diverse fields who provided feedback on how the educational program could be adjusted and improved. Adjustments were made to the curriculum based on their feedback. MMFC then worked with the Department of Social Development to identify and recruit the first set of social workers to be trained through the program. Thirty-three social workers were trained in English and French in early 2010. Seventy-eight percent of these participants worked with the Department of Social Development and the remaining 22% were from First Nations communities, community agencies or other government departments. Subsequently, five of these individuals implemented workshops for their peers and other professionals., Evaluation Report for “Understanding the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence - Helping Social Workers to Better Intervene: A Train-the-Trainer Program”
Atteindre son potentiel: un atelier pour les femmes qui ont survécu à la violence conjugale - le cahier de la participante
Atteindre son potentiel: un atelier pour les femmes qui ont survécu à la violence conjugale - le cahier de la participante
Le cahier de la participante a été développée pour les femmes victimes de violence conjugale. Veuillez noter que l’information peut aussi être utilisée auprès des hommes victimes de violence conjugale.
Atteindre son potentiel: un atelier pour les femmes qui ont survécu à la violence conjugale - le guide du facilitateur
Atteindre son potentiel: un atelier pour les femmes qui ont survécu à la violence conjugale - le guide du facilitateur
Ce manuel a pour but d’aider les femmes victimes de violence conjugale à bâtir une vie plus saine et plus sûre pour elles-mêmes et leurs enfants. Pour atteindre ce but, nous avons établi trois objectifs : 1) habiliter les femmes à mener une vie plus saine et sécuritaire ; 2) encourager les femmes à participer à l’élimination de la violence conjugale; et 3) donner aux femmes un plus grand sentiment de sécurité. Le manuel contient des renseignements et des questions qui peuvent vous être utiles de diverses façons, dont les suivantes : 1) pour offrir un atelier aux femmes survivantes de violence conjugale dans votre communauté ; et 2) pour vous renseigner, et pour renseigner vos collègues, sur les situations de violence conjugale.
Behind the screen: assessing needs for the prevention and elimination of cyberviolence against young women in New Brunswick
Behind the screen: assessing needs for the prevention and elimination of cyberviolence against young women in New Brunswick
In recent years, communication technologies have had a profound impact on the ways in which individuals and groups interact with one another. In Canada, high-profile cases of cyberviolence are forcing communities to engage more deeply with issues of online violence and bullying, including the ways in which these forms of aggression are directed at young women. Cyberviolence can be broadly defined as harm caused by one individual or group to another using cyber-technologies including the internet, mobile phones, applications, and social media. Cyberviolence can include bullying, harassment, non-consensual sharing of intimate images, luring, or images of child sexual abuse. The issue of cyberviolence can be framed in many ways - as an issue related to mental health, public health and safety, or as an issue related to violence against women. This report examines cyberviolence against young women in the context of New Brunswick.
Domestic homicide in New Brunswick, 1999–2008
Domestic homicide in New Brunswick, 1999–2008
After the announcement by the provincial government in 2009 of the creation of a domestic violence death review committee (DVDRC) and the announcement by Public Safety Minister and Solicitor General in February 2010 of work starting by DVDRC members, the Muriel McQueen Fergusson Centre for Family Violence Research (MMFC) was approached to conduct a study of domestic homicide in New Brunswick. The research was conducted between June and December 2010. Few studies have been conducted on domestic homicide in the province of New Brunswick and none have examined all deaths related to domestic violence. This study is an attempt to present a comprehensive analysis of domestic violence deaths over a 10-year period (1999–2008), in the province of New Brunswick. The objective of this examination of domestic violence fatalities is to better understand what leads to death in domestic violence situations in order to prevent future deaths. Three main questions led the study: 1) What can we learn from domestic homicide cases in New Brunswick?, 2) What are the risk factors of domestic homicide?, and 3) What steps can be taken to prevent domestic homicide from happening? A comprehensive analysis of domestic violence deaths over a 10-year period (1999–2008) will identify deaths directly or indirectly caused by domestic violence, will track the prevalence of evidence-based risk factors for domestic homicide, and will help to understand the unique etiology of domestic homicides. Given that it is only recently that researchers have taken a retrospective examination of domestic homicide to learn about and prevent domestic violence this report includes a description of the process of creating the sample; the methodology for the review of all cases and its limitations; a statistical analysis; and recommendations for consideration to the Committee/Chief Coroner.
Enhancing civil protection in domestic violence cases: cross Canada checkup
Enhancing civil protection in domestic violence cases: cross Canada checkup
Concerns about the operation of civil protection order proceedings in intimate-partner/domestic violence (DV) cases have been raised repeatedly in legal-system research in many jurisdictions, including Canada. Yet effective civil protection orders can make the difference between lives harmed and lives saved. In a search for solutions, this paper connects domestic-violence research, research on the operation of legal systems in domestic violence cases, and civil protection processes and options (case law and statutes) across Canada. The goals are to support the work of professionals and to enhance the health and safety of families and children in DV cases. For purposes of this paper, the term ‘civil protection’ excludes discussion of criminal protection orders, such as peace bonds, and orders pursuant to child protection legislation. Nonetheless the term includes discussion of civil protection options pursuant to: 1) federal, provincial and territorial family law legislation, 2) provincial and territorial marital property legislation, and 3) provincial/territorial DV prevention statutes (listed in Chapter 16.1). The report adopts a problem-solving approach. PART ONE identifies principles of practice associated with effective options generated from analysis of sociolegal evaluations of the operation of the legal system in DV cases. PART TWO connects the principles discussed in Part One to particular types of protection proceedings across Canada (DV prevention legislation, restraining order legislation, and protection legislation connected to possession of marital home and personal property). PART THREE identifies gaps in Canadian legislation that, if addressed, could enhance family health and safety.
Les réalités auxquelles les fournisseurs de services ainsi que les survivantes de violence conjugale en milieu rural font face lorsqu'ils ont recours au système juridique
Les réalités auxquelles les fournisseurs de services ainsi que les survivantes de violence conjugale en milieu rural font face lorsqu'ils ont recours au système juridique
La violence conjugale, y compris la violence physique, psychologique et sexuelle ainsi que l'exploitation financière, est une réalité qui touche de nombreuses femmes. Depuis les années 70, les défenseurs des victimes débattent des réponses efficaces à la violence conjugale. Plusieurs ministères et organismes communautaires interviennent de différentes façons. Certains ont fondé des maisons de transition ou de deuxième étape, d'autres ont mis sur pied des comités multidisciplinaires sur la violence familiale. Le système de justice pénale a réagi en adoptant des lois et des politiques d'application de la loi, en créant des programmes de traitement pour les personnes violentes et en établissant des processus judiciaires spécialisés pour favoriser et coordonner les pratiques des systèmes juridiques et des services sociaux (Gill et Thériault, 2010). Or, malgré ces changements, la majorité des cas de violence conjugale ne sont toujours pas signalés. Pour résoudre le problème du nombre insuffisant de signalements et offrir un meilleur soutien aux survivantes de violence conjugale, nous devons absolument tirer des leçons des expériences des femmes qui ont demandé l'aide des systèmes officiels, et surtout du système juridique., Le projet «Les réalités auxquelles les fournisseurs de services ainsi que les survivantes de violence conjugale en milieu rural font face lorsqu'ils ont recours au système juridique » est un projet du Centre Muriel McQueen Fergusson pour la recherche sur la violence familiale (CMMF). Il fut réalisé en partenariat avec l'Association des travailleurs sociaux du Nouveau-Brunswick. (ATSNB).

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